in Shaftesbury

Who killed Tyneham Road’s trees?

Two trees on Tyneham Road have been killed by vandals. They were young trees, placed in as part of the replanting programme, but will die after their trunks were severed close to the roots.

Quite what motivated the vandalism is a mystery. There have been some justified concerns about the size of some of the trees on the estate, but these were many years off falling into that category.

I contacted the council’s tree section who confirmed that the cut was so low there was no potential for the trees to survive but that the sites, outside 99 and 109 Tyneham Road, are scheduled for replacement in the winter planting season later this year.

Unfortunately there are no witnesses at present, although the council are preparing a letter for nearby households to see if anyone has any information. If you did see something, please contact the council or, if you wish, feel free to contact me to pass on the information.

Ghost sign, Battersea Park

Sign pointing to the deer enclosure

Signs pointing to the children’s zoo, deer enclosure and Victorian cascades in Battersea Park, London

I do rather like this sign, since to me it harks back to Battersea Park’s Victorian heritage (if I’m honest I have no idea if the deer were one of the original features).

The deer were removed in 2001, ostensibly as a temporary measure, during the outbreak of foot and mouth. There was never any intention for them to return—the removal was an opportunistic council cut—but the sign remains near the café on East Carriage Drive hinting at the possibility they might one day be back.

Occasionally it even points the right way.

What’s wrong with being a bit Soviet over the Olympics?

There are many reasons the Soviet comparison is wrong, but an interesting piece: This Olympics hysteria shows that Britain has turned Soviet

Throughout the cold war, Soviet bloc nations used sport as a proxy for economic success. With the connivance of the International Olympic Committee, they turned what used to be an amateur sport into the equivalent of a national defence force, hurling money and status at their athletes

There might be something to that view, but if the Olympics really are a modern equivalent of bread and circuses is that actually a bad thing? There are many worse ways to build a sense of national pride.