VICTORY!

I know I petulantly boycotted the ballot, but I’m so proud of democracy I could burst!

The people have spoken. Asda is in Battersea!

I’m not going to dwell on the ugly battles before like the time Mick Beck “confirmed” the store was in Clapham or point out that they are re-adopting a name they refused to admit they’d ever had (despite a relaunch with it two years ago).

No. Today is a day to be proud of Battersea, because it was Battersea that produced such a magnificent result. I suggest we all celebrate with something fizzy from Waitrose!

From their press release:

ASDA RE-LAUNCHES WITH NEW BATTERSEA NAME

After weeks of debate amongst local residents, councillors, the local MP, and community groups, Asda is proud to announce the new name of the store as “Asda Clapham Junction, Battersea” following an instore ballot.

Even though the final ballot results showed Asda Clapham Junction as a favourite with customers the store were keen to ensure Clapham Junction is still recognised as being at the heart of Battersea.

Full Ballot results

  • Asda Clapham Junction 374 votes
  • Asda Battersea 350 votes
  • Asda Clapham Junction Battersea 109 votes
  • Asda Clapham 91 votes

General Store Manager, Mick Beck, said: “I’m delighted that we have finally come to a decision on the store name, we’re incredibly proud of our location and we would like to thank our customers who took the time to come in and vote – here’s to the new and improved, ASDA Clapham Junction, Battersea.”

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  • http://davecurran.blogspot.com David Curran

    Who says you can never take on a big dodgy corporation eh? Well done to you and the others involved for diligently chipping away at this one – it’s also a victory for common sense…

    I missed the ‘election’ by a day but did get to talk to Michael Beck (after being sent from pillar to post within the store for a while), who was polite and who actually seemed quite sensible to be honest. Hopefully the message has got through that Wal-Mart is powerful, but not yet powerful enough to rename towns and cities.